ATARI VCS/2600 Controllers

Updated 6-24-2017

 

All the controllers listed below use the standard 9-pin D-sub connector, and are compatible to some extent with the Atari VCS/2600 system, including those specifically made for other systems.

For information on how to fix Atari-made controllers, see this section of the Atari VCS/2600 FAQ.

If you have any additions, suggestions, or corrections, please email me.

 

Joysticks
Paddles
Trackballs
Keypads
Specialty Controllers
Auto-Fire Modules
Accessories

 

Joysticks

 

   
  Action Hi-Tech Hi-Score Mark 1

Released in Australia.

  Action Hi-Tech Hi-Score Mark 2

Released in Australia.

  Action Hi-Tech Hi-Score Mark 3

Released in Australia.

  Advanced Gravis Computer Technology Ltd.  - MK VI

A somewhat rare version of the more-popular PC analog version.  An 8-position joystick with centering tension control and 3 independent fire buttons, as well as a one-year warranty. Retailed for $39.95. Made in both black and clear cases.  It seems the clear version was made specifically for Sega systems, although both apparently work the same.

Advanced Gravis Computer Technology Ltd. Gravis MouseStick

Designed for the Amiga and Atari ST computers. Can be used as either a joystick or a mouse.

Alberici  Albatros

At least 3 different versions exist.

Alliance Res Studio Spec

A ball-top joystick that uses leaf switches for the directions, and a micro contact switch for the fire button, which is on the front side of the base.

Amiga CD32

Clear the runway, the Flying Wing is about to take off!  Not sure why someone would design a controller that keeps your hands shoulder-width apart.

Amiga The Power-Stick

Originally called The Pro-Stick, this tiny controller fits in your palm and has a stick you can maneuver easily with two fingers.  According to company literature, this was first shown at the Atlanta Toy Fair in 1983. Featuring a 1.5" handle and dual fire buttons (for either left or right-handed players) and offering a "completely new precision switching technology", the company's director of marketing, Don Reisinger, claimed it provided true 8-way response, unlike typical controllers that only use 4 switches. Surprise - the new switching technology is the same used in Atari's 5200 controllers (using a carbon dot membrane against copper traces). Advertised for $9.95 each or $19.95 for a pair.

Amiga The Power-Stick - 3201

One of at least 7 controllers in Amiga's "Power-Stick" series. This was designed especially for the Commodore VIC-20 and C-64 computers and is identical except for its colors.

  Amiga The Power-Stick

Specially designed for the Intellivision and Colecovision. The photo on the left is from a company press kit.

Ancien joystick

A 2-button controller with a base similar to a Spectravideo QuickShot II 318-102.

Aneroussis Control Pac-Man

Sturdy microswitch controller made in Greece.

Aneroussis Control Pac-Man

Sturdy 2-button microswitch controller in a plastic shell made in Greece.

Aneroussis Control Starfighter SF 2000

Sturdy microswitch controller in a plastic shell made in Greece that features auto-fire.  Identical to the Superstick 2000 except for having a larger fire button.

Aneroussis Control Superstick 2000

Sturdy microswitch controller in a plastic shell made in Greece that features auto-fire.  Identical to the Starfighter SF 2000.

Aneroussis Control Superstick 2000 For Ever

Sturdy microswitch controller in a plastic shell made in Greece that's identical to the Superstick 2000 except for having a square fire button and an LED next to the auto-fire switch.

Aneroussis Control Tomahawk

Sturdy microswitch controller in a plastic shell made in Greece.

Anitech joystick

The base looks identical to Atari's standard joystick, except it's red (with a black button), and has "Anitech" in raised letters at the top. The stick itself is similar to a Quick-Shot and others, with a square fire button on top.

Apple Vision joystick

Standard controller for the Apple Vision system.

Archer Deluxe Competition Joystick - 270-1701

Identical to the Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot.  This was sold in Radio Shack.

Archer joystick - 270-1702

Identical to Kraft's Maze Master joystick.

Archer Super Deluxe Competition Joystick - 270-1703

Uses microswitches and has auto-fire capability. Came in 2 different boxes.

Arvel Joy Card

2-button "joypad", each with its own auto-fire switch.

Atari Flashback 2

Remakes usually involve an attempt to correct previous flaws and weak points - not a chance to introduce new ones.  While the switch contacts are an improvement, the stick itself is made to be detached (unscrewed), as if they wanted players to lose or break them.  But why?  To save a few pennies with shipping?  The stick itself is comprised of 2 pieces.  The stick can be separated from its base, and once you lose either part, you might as well thrown the whole thing out.  Even worse, guess where these sticks typically break?  If the top of the stick doesn't detach from the base, it will (very) likely break off at the base.  And since its release in 2005, a great many gamers have reported them breaking at the controller's "Achilles' heel".  This is what happens when non-gamers try to design products for gamers.

Atari Flashback 3

Not much difference between this and the Flashback 2 model.  The Atari logo on the top and bottom is now the original version, the threaded parts where the handle screws into the base are now red, the pcb is slightly different where the wires are soldered, and the button membrane is now white instead of gray.  The joystick handle also has a looser movement to it, but otherwise it's the same, flawed controller.

Atari Power Control Pad - CX78

Also known as the Joypad. The direction pad has a removable thumb stick. This was originally to be released with the 7800 in an attempt to capitalize on the rising popularity of the Nintendo NES and its controllers, but only saw release overseas.

Atari Pro-Line joystick - CX24

Originally one of Atari's "Pro-Line" Advanced Controllers.  A company flyer notes it was coming in July 1983, with a photo showing "Atari Series 2000 Pro-Line Joystick" molded into the top of the plastic base (LINK).  However, this version was never released; they were released with a slight variant of it - in place of the molded plastic was a metal plate on the base with "Atari" on it, and with packaging similar to that used for the XL computers.  When the 7800 was first released in 1984, each button worked independently for games that required 2 fire buttons.

Atari Remote Control Wireless joysticks - CX42

One of Atari's "Pro-Line" Advanced Controllers, but not made by Atari. These are identical to the Game Mate 2 controllers sold by Cynex. A company flyer notes they would be available April 1st, 1983. Similar in style to the standard CX40 joysticks but with a huge base, and each one requires a 9v transistor battery. Antennas encased in plastic transmit a signal to a black box which hooks into the system's joystick ports. Maximum range is approx. 20 feet. First announced in the January 1983 issue of Electronic Games with a suggested retail price of $100. Later featured in Atari's 1983 "2nd Half" press kit. Advertised in the V2N4 issue of Atari Age for $69.95.

Atari Space Age Joystick - CX43

One of Atari's "Pro-Line" Advanced Controllers. A compact stick resembling the handle of a pistol with a small knob-like stick at the top. There's only 1 fire button (the red top on the joystick is not a button). This stick looks identical to Milton Bradley's proposed HD2000 joystick. It's possible that Atari got the stick as part of their dealings regarding the unreleased Voice Commander Module. A company flyer notes it was available July 1983.

Atari Standard Joystick - CX10

This is the type of controller most familiar to people, featuring one (and only one) red fire button. A brilliantly-designed controller by Steve Bristow (patent 4,124,787). The original version, which was only made for the 2600's debut year (1977) uses heavy springs with all the contact switches, giving it a much looser feel than the more-common CX40 sticks. They also don't say "TOP" in the dotted outline around the stick, and the top of the stick is recessed to hold a small "ATARI" hex-shaped plate (there was also a "SEARS" button for the Tele-Games system).

Atari Standard Joystick - CX40

This is the far more common version, featuring a more cost-effective (ie cheap) design by James C. Asher (patent 4,349,708). This was sold separately in several different box styles. A 3rd version of this venerable controller was also made for the Atari XE version which is molded in gray plastic, though the boot (stick handle) is still black.  Original retail price $9.95; later $10.95/pair.

 

Atari Standard Joystick - CX40 "XE"

A 3rd version of this venerable controller was also made for the Atari XE version which is molded in gray plastic, though the boot (stick handle) is still black.

Bebek joystick

Similar to an Atari standard joystick but with 3 fire buttons.

Beeshu Hot Stuff

A 4-button joystick that comes in black, pink, dark blue, light blue, green, and yellow and features auto-fire. The base looks similar to a QuickShot II.

Beeshu Ultimate Superstick Joy Stick

Features 2 pairs of buttons (marked A and B) and a variable auto-fire.

Best Electronics The Best Joystick - CX34

Identical to Telegames' Super Deluxe joystick and features auto-fire.

 

BP Electronics joystick - V-8801

Similar to the Bebek joystick but having 2 fire buttons on the base and a ball-top handle.

BP Electronics, Inc. Pro-Stick - V-8802

Similar to BP's joystick but with a larger handle that includes another fire button. Features "sure fire control", which might be in reference to it having 3 fire buttons.

Bit Corp. joystick

Identical to the Gemini Turbo Gemstick Joystick.  Standard controller for the Amigo system.

Bit Corp. Video Game Joystick

Standard controller for the BIT-7000 system. Although it's called a joystick, it's a joypad.

Bondwell QuickShot - QS-130F

Features auto-fire.

Bondwell Quickshot FlightGrip QS-129F

Shaped like a handlebar and featuring an 8-way directional thumb-pad and auto-fire.

  Bondwell QuickShot game pad - QS-181
Bondwell Quickshot Apache 1 QS-131

A unique Cobra head-like controller with 2 fire buttons, a start button, and a turbo (auto-fire) button.

Bondwell Quickshot Eagle 1

A unique Cobra head-like controller with 2 fire buttons, a start button, and a turbo (auto-fire) button.

Bondwell QuickShot Intruder 1 - QS-149

Features auto-fire.

Bondwell QuickShot Maverick - QS-128F
Bondwell QuickShot Maverick 3 - QS-162
  Bondwell QuickShot - QS-129F

A joypad controller that resembles a handle bar.

Bondwell Quickshot Python 1 Turbo III QS-130F

Features "BioGrip control and deluxe digital response" (um, ok), with 2 fire buttons, auto-fire, a 4-position operating mode selector, and suction cups on the base.

Bondwell QuickShot - QS-131

Similar to the QS-130F except the fire button is round, and it lacks auto-fire.

  Bondwell QuickShot - QS-138F

Joystick that plugged in to both ports and allowed 2 players to use the same controller.

Bondwell Quickshot Python 1M QS-137F

The "M" in the name denotes it's compatible with multiple systems… like every other controller that uses the same 9-pin D-sub connector.  Yep, looks the same as the Python 1 to me.

Bondwell Quickshot Python 3 QS-135

Similar to the Python 1 except for having more thumb buttons. Designed specifically for the Sega Genesis.

Bondwell QuickShot Starfighter

Joypad controller that features auto-fire. Identical to the TechnoPlus Swift.

Bondwell QuickShot Starfighter - QS-127

Wireless joypad controller that features auto-fire.

Bondwell Quickshot Wizmaster - QS-118F

The direction pad has a removable thumb stick. The center section is interchangeable with one that allows NES compatibility.

C&L Gun Shot

Looks similar to a QuickShot.

Camerica Freedom Stick

Wireless joystick that was also compatible with the NES and SMS.

  Canon MSX Joy Stick VJ-200

Marketed for use with the MSX HX-10 computer. This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

 

CCE Supergame Pro

Nearly identical to the Commodore VG-115 joystick but without auto-fire.

CCE VG 3000 joystick - JS 1500

Standard controller bundled with the VG 3000 system. Similar to the Coleco Dual Command and Gemini controllers except w/o the paddle.

Championship Electronics MiniChamp - JC-351

Similar to the Reel-Up. Designed for gamers with small hands, featuring 3 fire buttons and a 4-1/2 foot retractable cord. Made specifically to be used in conjunction with the Champ Keypad Adapter for use with the Colecovision.   Originally sold for $12.95.

Championship Electronics MiniChamp

Variant with a red base and yellow fire buttons.

Championship Electronics SuperChamp - JC-250

Features 2 fire buttons on the base and only one on the stick. 10' retractable cord.  Retail price $16.95.

Championship Electronics Remote Champ

Wireless version of the SuperChamp controller.  Note the base of both are red.  Retail price $69.95.

Cheetah Marketing Alien 3

An Annihilator variant with "ALIEN 3" in raised silver lettering at the top and a stick in the shape of H.R. Giger's Alien.  Released in 1990.

Cheetah Marketing Alien 3

A Cheetah 125 variant with "ALIEN 3" in raised silver lettering at the top and a stick in the shape of H.R. Giger's Alien.  There's also 2 switches, with one possibly being for auto-fire.  Released in 1990.

Cheetah Marketing Annihilator

This 3-button joystick was bundled with the C-64GS console (which was only released in the UK, in 1990). Base looks very similar to a Gemini Gemstick.

Cheetah Marketing Bart Simpson

An Annihilator variant except with a blue base, a yellow fire button, and a joystick handle in the shape of Bart Simpson.  Released in 1990.

Cheetah Marketing Bart Simpson

A Cheetah 125 variant with a blue base, yellow fire buttons, and a joystick handle in the shape of Bart Simpson.  There's also 2 switches, with one possibly being for auto-fire.  Released in 1990.

Cheetah Marketing Batman Returns

An Annihilator variant with "BATMAN" in raised red lettering at the top and a stick in the shape of Batman.  Released in 1990.

Cheetah Marketing Batman Returns

A Cheetah 125 variant with "BATMAN" in raised red lettering at the top and a stick in the shape of Batman.  There's also 2 switches, with one possibly being for auto-fire.  Released in 1990.

Cheetah Marketing The Bug

Designed to be held in your palm and has a turbo switch. Came in at least 2 different colors.

Cheetah Marketing Cheetah 125

Cheetah Marketing was a UK-based company that later changed their name to Cheetah International Ltd.

Cheetah Marketing Cheetah 125+

Similar to the 125 except it has a rotating stick and an extra button that's programmable.

Cheetah Marketing Star Probe
Cheetah Marketing Terminator

Another in their long line of uncomfortable joysticks.  Similar to the Cheetah 125 except with a silver base and a joystick handle in the shape of the Terminator's head (with a fire button in its forehead).  Also features auto-fire.  Released in 1990.

Chips Do Brasil - Computer Video Game Control Pad

Copy of the Sega Genesis controller.

Chips Do Brasil - Computer Video Game Control Pad Pro-1

Copy of the Sega Genesis controller. There's a switch on the bottom marked 'A' and 'B'.

Chips Do Brasil - Computer Video Game Control Pad Pro-3 - SJ-4001

Copy of the Sega Genesis controller, with more buttons.

CirKa - A77 Atari Style Joystick Controller

Copy of the Atari Standard joystick controller, but according to online reviews, the quality of them is quite poor.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro

A very high-quality controller that features a ball top joystick and 2 large fire buttons, and uses leafswitches.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro 200X

Features a wide fire button, which is idea for either left or right-handed players. The internals utilize a heavy coin for the contact mechanism, instead of traditional leaf or microswitches.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro 1000

Similar to the 200X, except having a red fire button.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro 3000

Similar to the 1000 but with a larger handle that has 2 additional fire buttons.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro 5000

Identical to the original except that it uses microswitches. Several variations of this joystick exist, with different-colored sticks and bases.  Coin Control, Inc. also made these for both the 5200 and Colecovision.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro 5000 Mean Green

Another variation.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro Deluxe

Identical to the 5000, except it has a chrome ball top joystick and chrome fire buttons. It also features a 3-position switch for auto-fire and "slow down" and 2 additional fire buttons. Several variations of this joystick exist, with different-colored sticks and bases.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro Extra

Identical to the 5000, except it has a clear base and a 3-position switch for auto-fire and "slow down".  Several variations of this joystick exist, with different-colored sticks and bases.  A variant of the clear version has a clear internal ring for the joystick instead of red.

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro Glo Extra

Identical to the Competition Pro Extra (with auto-fire and "slow down"), except it is green and possibly glows in the dark?

Coin Control, Inc. Competition Pro Mini

A smaller version of the Competition Pro, with microswitches soldered onto a circuit board, making it less-durable.  Available in differently-colored versions as well.  The green version has silver buttons and 2 LEDs internally that light up when pressed.

Colani HighScreen
Coleco Adam controller

Standard controller for the Adam.

Coleco Colecovision controller

Standard controller for the Colecovision.

Coleco Dual Command

Combination joystick+paddle. Description: "Advanced Controller Set with Built-in Joystick & Paddle. Now your customers can play all Atari 2600 VCS compatible games requiring joystick or paddle with one set of controllers. The DUAL COMMAND controllers were designed with a responsive, omni-directional joystick and side-mounted fire buttons, plus a rotary paddle control. These inexpensive high-quality controllers plug right into the control ports of the Atari 2600 VCS, or ColecoVision Expansion Module #1. They're also original equipment replacements for Coleco's Gemini Video Game System. To switch from joystick to paddle, just use the included Wye connector. The DUAL COMMAND controllers offer improved control at a price that's right!"  Using the Y cable doesn't switch between joystick and paddle, but simply allows 2 or more players to play paddle games using these controllers.

Coleco Gemini Video Game System

Same as Dual Command.

Coleco Super Action Controller

Designed for the Colecovision, for use with their Super Action sports games.

  Columbia Home Arcade controller

Combination joystick+paddle, identical to the Coleco Gemini's.

Commodore joystick - 1311

Standard 1-button joystick with a triangular-shaped joystick that's guaranteed to give one blisters.

Commodore joystick - T-1341

Black pistol grip handle-shaped joystick with a single, rectangular fire button on top..

Commodore joystick - 1399

White joystick that is covered in fire buttons (at least 5).

Commodore VIC-20 joystick

Blatant ripoff of Atari's standard joystick, with a white top casing and raised "Commodore" lettering in silver paint.  According to an article in the November 29th, 1982 issue of InfoWorld (pg. 5), Atari filed a lawsuit against Commodore on October 11th, 1982, and won an injunction to halt the sale of them.

  Commodore Switch Joy

One of the last joysticks released under the Commodore label.

Commodore joystick VG-115

A 4-button joystick known for being very fragile. Has a base similar to a Spectravideo QuickShot II 318-102.  Features auto-fire.

Commodore VG-250

Features auto-fire.

Commodore Amiga VG-250

Features auto-fire. Identical to the VG-250 except for being white (instead of black) and having a different label.

Company Micro Systems (CMS) Controller Super 8+

Sturdy microswitch controller that features auto-fire and the option to use either a stick or ball (both were included in the box and could be screwed/unscrewed to change).  This is the same company as Micro Technica / John Micro System.

Company Micro Systems (CMS) Controller Super 8+

A 2-button controller in a plastic shell that came with a 1-year warranty. Models with 1, 2, 4, or 6 buttons were made, with most meant for use with a PC.

CMS started using plastic shells because of an issue with the Amstrad CPC computer. The metal casing created static electricity, which damaged the AY-3-8912 Amstrad chip, and legal action was brought against CMS.

Computec joystick

Standard controllers included with the Computec Video Game System clone.  The controllers resemble Gemini Gemsticks but with the bases in white plastic.

Computek Turbo

Similar to the Wico Boss with 2 fire buttons and "TURBO" in raised letters on the base, and a slightly-different handle. Features auto-fire.

Computek Turbo Quick Gun Pro

2 different versions exist - one with a small knob stick and the other with the same stick as the original Turbo model.  Both features auto-fire.

Computek Turbo

Similar to the Wico Boss with 2 fire buttons and "TURBO" in raised letters on the base, and a slightly-different handle. Features auto-fire.  Available in either black and red, or all gray.

Comrex ComMander - CR-301

Designed for left or right-handed use, the stick is able to move in 360 degrees and uses microswitches. Retail price $19.95.

Comrex ComMander Deluxe

Retail price $14.95.

Cynex Manu. Corp Game Mate 2 Remote Control Wireless Joysticks

Same as Atari's CX42 joysticks. Retail price $99.95!

D Zyne Video Production Inc. Supr Stick

A 1-button joystick with a lifetime warranty that features microswitchs for the joystick and a leafswitch for the fire button.  A version was also designed specifically for the Colecovision with 2 buttons and a keypad.  Retail price $39.95.

Dactar joystick

Standard controller for the Dactar Video Game system.  Same as the Milmar joystick.  The handle is identical to the Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot 318-101.

Dansk Joystick Productions Dan-Joy

A microswitch controller similar to Suzo's The Arcade.

Datasoft Le Stick

Tilt switch joystick. Uses mercury switches to sense movement of the stick in mid-air. When did giving a controller full of mercury to kids seem like a good idea?  Retail price $39.95.

Digivision Robby joystick

Bundled with the Digivision console.  Looks identical to the original Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot.

Discwasher PointMaster Competition Joystick

Has a rectangular-shaped fire button on the top of the joystick. Retail price $16.95.

Discwasher PointMaster Pro

Similar to the original PointMaster joystick except this has an auto-fire mode and suction-cupped feet. Retail price $27.95.

Dismarc Superstick

Identical to the Crack Shot Super Joystick.

Dynacom Destroyer Turbo Joypad

A Genesis controller clone with 6 buttons and a removable stick attachment.

Dynacom Turbo Pad Control - TPC-4

A Genesis controller clone with 6 buttons and a removable stick attachment.

Dynacom Dynastick Controller, The

Standard controller for the Dynavision system.  The handle is a copy of Spectravision/Spectravideo's Quick-Shot 318-101.  There are 4 suction cups on the bottom.  A variant exists that is grey and white with red lettering.

Elecom Joy Card - JC-200

2-button "joypad", each with its own auto-fire switch.

Electra Concepts Corp. Triga Command

The Atari 5200 Masterplay guys briefly sold this clunky joystick controller. The name "TRIGA-COMMAND" (hyphenated) is in raised lettering across the top, it's not with their packaging, plus the photo in their ad doesn't show any raised lettering.  Retail price $19.95.

Electra Concepts Corp. Triga Command II

Not sure what makes this different from the original version, but it certainly didn't warrant a sequel.  Retail price $10.95.

Electra Concepts Corp. Triga Elite

Features a "continuous-fire" bar.  According to a blurb in the June 1984 issue of Antic (pg. 79), only this model could be used with the Atari XL computers.  Retail price $23.95.

Elite joystick

A 3-button joystick made in either black+white, or gray.

Elite joystick

A 3-button joystick with the buttons in a different configuration.

Elite Joy Board Multifunction

The joystick uses microswitches. There are 2 small knobs which function as paddles, and a switch selects between using the joystick or paddles.  There's a switch that controls auto-fire, which is variable with a 3rd knob. Each button has a red LED indicator above it.

Elite Joy Board Multifunction - JB-2

Similar to the original Joy Board Multifunction (JB-1?) controller, except instead of a auto-fire speed variable knob, there's a 4-way green LED direction indicator.

Elite Sigma 1001

A 2-button controller that features arcade-style buttons and auto-fire.

Elite Multi-Function 2002

A 2-button controller that features arcade-style buttons and variable auto-fire.  It also features 2 paddle controls.

Emax Computing Arcade Professional

Released in 1984 for the European market, with some success in France and Germany, despite its high price of £30 (approximately 74 DM or 4,708 Francs, which equates to about 40 Euros or $43 US).  It was also released as the Euromax Arcade Professional in the UK.  The controller measures 36cm X 20cm and features an arcade-style ball-top handle.  The joystick can be adjusted for 2, 4, or 8-way movement and also features two fire buttons - one of which is dedicated auto-fire. The photo was taken from a German website.

Enix Hyper Controller - EOJ-01

Features four fire buttons - two of which are dedicated auto-fire.

Epyx 500XJ

Same as Konix's SpeedKing.

Epyx 500XJ

Includes an auto-fire switch.

Epyx 500XJ analog

Dual fire buttons but only Button A is used with Atari 2600 games. A switch chooses between either free-form analog control or a spring-loaded "return-to-center" digital control.

Epyx 500XJ with Autofire

Dual fire buttons but only Button A is used with Atari 2600 games. Auto-fire is activated by sliding the switch into position and holding the A fire button.

Euromax Pro Ace Competition Joystick

Identical to Zip Stik's Competition Joystick.

Euromax Pro Ace Competition Joystick

Variant with a long handle with a fire button on top.

Euromax Mirco-Handler

All-in-1 combination joystick+paddle controller. It features a metal case, 2 fire buttons, and 2 small paddle controls. A small switch selects between the joystick and paddles. The 3rd dial adjusts the auto-fire. It also has suction cups on the bottom. Retail price is £24.95.

Fourth Dimension Computing Ltd. Rapier

 

Framer Associates and Co. Challenger - GX.112

Features 2 fire buttons, auto-fire, and a rounded base somewhat similar to some Championship Electronics joysticks.

Framer Associates Inc. Challenger - K-30

Features 2 triangular-shaped fire buttons and suction cups on the bottom. The box states there's an optional auto-fire function which is complete marketing b.s. since there's no auto-fire circuitry inside. There's 2 holes underneath the "Challenger" sticker, so perhaps there was another model (or plans for one) with extra buttons or switches. The box also shows a different model without the sticker or the holes. Manufactured by Framer Assoc. Inc, P.O. Box 201, Sharon, MA 02067..

  Fujitsu FM-X - MB27150

Marketed for use with the MSX HX-10 computer.  This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

 

Funvision joystick

Another 3-button Atari standard variant.  The stick itself is similar to a Quick-Shot and others, with a rounded fire button on top.  Similar to Rinco's joystick except the rubber boot has more ridges.

Funvision joystick

Standard controller for Funvision's Home Computer Game system. Similar to the Atari Pro-Line controller and identical to the Kingsway system controller. The sticks can be unscrewed.

G.A.M.E.S. Super Joystick

Very small (1 inch) joystick. Came with a 1-year warranty. Retail price $29.95.

  Game-Tech Pro-Stick

Mentioned in the 1982 #8 issue of A.N.A.L.O.G. as a new product.

  Games, Inc. Apex Super Joystick

Same as Newport Controls' Prostick I.  Retail price $29.95.

  GCE Firepower

Advertised at the Summer 1982 CES show, to be available in October. Featured 2 fire buttons and the ability to use with one hand, with a patent pending on the internal switch mechanism. Retail price $14.95.

Gemini Gemstick VG170B

Standard joystick controller identifiable by its yellow fire button.

Gemini Gemstick 2

Similar to the Gemstick except for having 2 fire buttons.

Gemini Gemstick-Pro VG171B

A unique 2-button joystick with a contoured joystick button and a wider base.  The pcb is stamped September 1983.

Gemini Joystick VG-110

Identical to Kraft's Ace joystick except for having "JOYSTICK" in raised, yellow lettering on the top of the case, instead of "ACE".

Gemini Joystick VG-170

Identical to Atari's standard joystick except it has "GEMINI" in raised letters on the top above the stick and "VG-170" in raised letters below it.

Gemini Keypad Gemstick

Designed for the Colecovision.  Looks identical to Amiga's The Power-Stick.

Gemini Mini Gemstick

Looks identical to Amiga's The Power-Stick.

Gemini Turbo Gemstick Joystick

The base is identical to the Gemstick, but the handle is larger and includes a fire button. A variant also exists with red buttons instead of yellow.

GIM Electronics Fire Command - VC-2001

Heavy-duty micro-switch controller that works quite well but is a little stiff. It has a fire button on either side of the stick and weighs a whopping four pounds!  It's an extremely rare stick (only a few have currently been confirmed to exist).  The ad mentions Ultra Tech Distributors but not GIM Electronics Corp.  Retail price $39.95.

 

GIM Electronics Fire Command II - VC-2001

Identical to the Fire Command, except for having a base-mounted switch to allow both buttons to work separately for Colecovision systems.

GIM Electronics Fire Command - VC-2001C

Identical to the Fire Command, except for having 4 fire buttons; designed for use with the Colecovision.  The ad mentions Ultra Tech Distributors but not GIM Electronics Corp.  Retail price $44.95.

 

Gradiente MSX Joy Stick

Marketed for use with the MSX HX-10 computer. This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

 

Greika Joy-Stick

Clone of the Discwasher PointMaster Competition Joystick.

  Human Engineered Software (HES) Hestick I

Mentioned in the April 1983 issue of Creative Computing (pg. 30).  Retail price $7.95.

Hitachi joystick

Marketed for use with the MSX HX-10 computer.  This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

Honey Bee CD32 Professional Control Pad - SF-3

Designed for use with the CD32 console.

  ICOMP (Individual Computers)/Speedlink Competition Pro

Latest reproduction of Suzo's Competition Pro joystick, but of lower quality.

J.D. Home Incorporated Obelisk

A large, free-standing controller made of hardwood and formica, and designed to be used while sitting. Available in 4 different colors. Retail price $89.95, with a 2-player option for an additional $29.95.

J.F. Commando

Identical to Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot 318-101.

John Micro System (JMS) Professional Joystick

Sturdy microswitch controller that features auto-fire with an LED.

Kingsway joystick

Standard controller for Kingsway's system. Similar to the Atari Pro-Line controller and identical to the Funvision system controller. The sticks can be unscrewed.

Konami JoySTICK

Shown in a 1983 Konami catalog.

Konix MegaBlaster
Konix Navigator

Features auto-fire.

Konix Predator

Has a base similar to Knoix's Navigator with the addition of an auto-fire switch, and a 2-button stick similar to Beeshu's Hot Stuff.

Konix SpeedKing

The video game market had already crashed when this palm-held joystick controller was introduced. It was likely intended for use on home computers.  It uses microswitches.

Konix SpeedKing

Variant that is labeled for 2 fire buttons (but only appears to have 1) and an auto-fire switch.

Kraft Systems, Inc. Ace P/N 820049

 

Kraft Systems, Inc. Maze Master 205-315

Originally advertised as the Switch Hitter and featuring 2 buttons, it was released with a different name and only 1 button, this black joystick has a small switch on the bottom to select between 4-way and 8-way mode.  Retail price $16.95 - $19.95.

 

Kraft Systems, Inc. Maze Master

Identical to the black version except for having a light beige case and a black fire button.  Originally shown as having 2 buttons and red lettering.  Retail price $16.95 - $19.95.

Kraft Systems, Inc. Starmaster P/N 820-102

A black and red stick with white buttons on the stick and base and suction cups on the bottom. The handle is identical to a Quick-Shot.  Retail price $16.95 - $19.95.

KY Enterprises Mouth Controller - 103

Controller designed for the disabled.  Includes controls for Select and Reset.  Retail price $65.

KY Enterprises Mouth Controller - 104

Controller designed for the disabled.  Same as model 103 except it includes paddle controller.  Retail price $75.

KY Enterprises Modified joystick - 106

Controller designed for the disabled.  Retail price $25.

KY Enterprises Modified joystick - 107

Controller designed for the disabled.  Same as model 106 except has controls for Select and Reset.  Retail price $35.

  Logic 3 Competition Pro Deluxe

All microswitches, 2 extra buttons, and auto-fire.

  Logic 3 Delta Ray

Includes some half-dozen fire buttons! Where's the logic in that?

Ludcel joystick

Blatant ripoff of Atari's standard joystick that includes a Pusher Grabber Ball-like accessory.

M-Network Video Games TRON Joystick

This is a favorite among collectors. It was first available for free in a Special Pack that included Adventures of TRON and TRON Deadly Discs.  It was later available via an offer inside copies of those games for $24.95. Replicating the arcade game's stick, this large controller has a wide round base and is easily distinguishable by it's bright blue plastic shell. This was made by Championship Electronics and is similar to their Champ Reel-Up controllers, except for the translucent blue casing and similar TRON arcade coin-op joystick.

Mastertronic Magnum

Another variant of the Milton Bradley MBX design.

Matt joystick

Made in Poland.

Matt Skorpion

Featuring... well... one of the most radical designs for a controller. Made in Poland.

MicroTechnica A.C.S.

Sturdy microswitch controller made in Greece and released in 1985.  It features auto-fire with an LED, and a second pass-thru joystick port on the backside, so that Amstrad CPC (who had only one joystick port) users could connect a second joystick to their computer.  A.S.C. stands for Amstrad / Spectrum / Commodore.  Identical to the JMS Professional Joysitck.  Micro Technica is the same company as John Micro System.  The company was renamed when his son joined the company.

MicroTechnica Super Control Joystick

Sturdy microswitch controller made in Greece that features speed and auto-fire switches.

Microdigital Game Control

Standard controller for the Onyx Junior system.  A variant exists that is black.

Milmar Joystick

Standard "joypad" controller for the Memory Game system.

Milmar Joystick

Standard controller for the TV Computer System.  Same as the Dactar joystick. The handle is identical to the Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot 318-101.

Mindscape Phasor One

Same as Mindscape's Power Player Controller.  Was made with either an all-black or all-red case.

Mindscape Power Player Controller

A black trigger-stick with red button and handle. A sticker with the controller's name lines the outer edge.  Sold in Europe as the Phasor One.

Mitsubishi joystick - ML-50JY

Marketed for use with the MSX HX-10 computer.  This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

Multicoin Amusements Battlestation II

A huge, 2-player controller that came in a storage bag. Can be configured for several different systems.

Multicoin Amusements Star Cursor - MCA-201

National 2-Trigger Joystick - CF 2211
New America Corp

A variant of the Atari standard joystick, but with "JOYSTICK" in raised letters on top of the base.  There's also a small, rectangular area on the top of the base in the lower-right corner that appears to have been for a plate or sticker.

New America Corp - CJ-8352

Similar to their standard CX-40 knockoff but with a thicker handle that has a 2nd fire button on top of it.  Also has the same small, rectangular area on the top of the base in the lower-right corner.

Newport Controls Prostick I

Rare joystick only available through mail order.

Newport Controls Prostick II

Features 2 fire buttons and the ability to switch between 4-way and 8-way. Included a 5-year warranty. Retail price $24.95.

Newport Controls Prostick III

Features the ability to switch between 4-way and 8-way, and a 'Tri-Fire Bar' that offers 2 independent fire buttons.  Also comes with a 'Y' adapter cord for use on Colecovision. Included a 5-year warranty. Retail price $29.95.

  Newport Controls Prostick 2002

Designed for the TI-99/4 and TI-99/4a computers and features a switchable gateplate. Included a 5-year warranty. Retail price $29.95.

NCE Joycard

Odd joypad controller that's designed to be used while holding the controller vertically!

Panasonic MSX Joy Pad - FS-JS220

Marketed for use with the MSX computer.

Percom Data Corp. Joycard

Used infrared instead of RF.  Retail price $49.95.

PPI (Personal Peripherals, Inc.) Super Stik

A red-handled joystick with a button on top of the stick.  Model J1020 is a set of joysticks wired together and designed for use with the TI-99/4a computer.

Power Play The Cruiser

Features a 3-level tension adjustment, 2 fire buttons, and microswitches. Besides black, it was also available in several different color styles, including clear.

Power Play Cruiser Turbo

Features auto-fire.

PowerTron Powertron I

Nearly identical to the Commodore VG-115 joystick.  There were also models for Sega (#2), Nintendo (#3), and Dynavision II (#4).

PowerTron Atak

2-button joypad designed for Atari.  ATAK stands for Accelerated Touch Advanced Kit.

PowerTron Atak II

2-button joypad designed for Sega.  ATAK stands for Accelerated Touch Advanced Kit.

PowerTron ST 5000

Identical to the Gemini Gemstick VG170.

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick Hyerstar

 

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick MegaBoard

 

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick MegaStar

A 3-button controller with a clear plastic shell.

  QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick MegaStar Jr.

 

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick QJ I Turbo - SV-121

 

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick QJ II Turbo - SV-124

Features a large, over-sized fire button on the top of the joystick, and auto-fire.  2 different boxes exist.

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick Quickjoy III Supercharger - SV-123

Came out in Europe at the same time with QJ I Turbo, QJ II Turbo, and QJ V, which were all also marketed here under Quickjoy label.

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick Quickjoy V Superboard - SV-125

Features the same joystick as the QJ II Turbo along with auto-fire, but with a multitude of buttons and switches and a built-in stop watch/timer.

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick QuickJoy 120 - SV-120

 

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick QuickJoy Infrared - SV-130

Similar to the QuickJoy 120 except that it's wireless (infrared).

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick QuickJoy Junior - SV 120

 

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick QuickJoy Top Star

 

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick SG Fighter

Identical to Spectravideo's SG Fighter A-Storm.  Unique 2-button joystick with LEDs and extra controls on the stick. Top of the joystick is marked PAT 1054353.

Quest Industries Inc. Questar II Joystick Console - QC-II

Features 8-way leaf switch joystick with 2 fire buttons.

Quest Industries Inc. Questar IIC Joystick Console - QC-IIC

Features 8-way leaf switch joystick with 2 sets of fire buttons. Designed for use with the Colecovision. Retail price $42.95.

Radio Shack joystick - CAT. NO. 26-3008
Recoton Big Shot
Recoton Big Shot II
REI StarCon 2600

An arcade style joystick made in very limited quantities by Rubatino Engineering Inc. This stick is fairly heavy, being made out of a wooden base with arcade components. REI only made roughly 100 joysticks total between this model and the 5200 version. Given the popularity of the 2600, it's safe to say that the majority of them were the 2600 model, although none have been found to date.

Replay MicroBlaster

A microswitch controller with a steel shaft and auto-fire.  Compumart had the exclusive rights to distribute this in the UK where it sold for £12.95 and was guaranteed for 12 months.

Retro-Bit Retro 2600

Identical to Atari's Standard Joystick CX-40.  Retail price $16.99.

RGA International Wireless Remote Video Controllers - RGA-118

Sold in pairs. Each joystick has 2 buttons and each is marked Right or Left. The box states the controllers feature "trigger action" but there's no button on the joystick for your index (trigger) finger. There's one on the base and one on top of the joystick. The handle is similar to a Quick-Shot.

RGA International Video Controller - RGA-1160

A 2-button controller with a handle identical to a Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot and a small, gray base.

RGA International Video Controller - RGA-1170

The handle is identical to a Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot, with a small 'pedestal' base and a four foot cord.

RGA International Video Controller - RGA-1250

A 3-button controller with a handle identical to a Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot and a black base similar to RGA's 1160 but with 2 buttons.  It has a compartment on the bottom that holds a 9 volt battery, but oddly enough there's no wires to connect the battery, so this might be the same joystick used with the RGA-118 remote controllers.

RGA International Video Controller Jr.

Similar to the Video Controller but with a shorter and square shaped joystick handle.

Richwide Technologies, Inc. Grip-It - G-101

Made in 1992, Grip-It is a one-handed controller similar in design to the Game Handler. It's designed for both the Nintendo NES and any system that uses a standard D-sub 9 pin connector (Sega Genesis, Atari, etc) by way of a special double-ended connector. It features a directional pad, 4 buttons, and an auto-fire switch. There are also 2 LED lights on the top. Patent #91300070-1

Rinco joystick

Another 2-button Atari standard variant.  Standard controller for the Rinco 128-in-1 system.  The base looks identical to Atari's standard joystick. The stick itself is similar to a Quick-Shot and others, with a rounded fire button on top.  Similar to Funvision's joystick except the rubber boot has less ridges. 

Roklan Corp. Unroller Controller

Bizarre little controller that looks like a trackball but functions as any digital joystick would (and doesn't output true analog signals). Pressing the top side of the "ball" is up, pressing the right side is right, etc.

  Sanyo Joy Stick- MJY-01

Marketed for use with the Sanyo MPC-200 computer.  This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

 

  Sanyo MSX Joy Stick - MJY-002

Marketed for use with the Sanyo MPC-200 computer.  This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

 

  Sansei Super-Controller

A joystick with an Asteroids-style button layout.

Sears Video Arcade joystick  - CX10

Made by Atari for the Sears Tele-Games Video Arcade system.  Identical to Atari's CX10 joystick, except for having a "Sears" hex-shaped plate.

  Sears Video Arcade II joystick/paddle

Made by Atari for the Sears Video Arcade II system.  They sold them with their 2800 system.  Sold as a pair and featuring combination joystick+paddle controls.

Sega Arcade Power Stick I - MK-1655-50
Sega Arcade Power Stick II - MK-1627-44
Sega Control Pad - 3020

Standard controller for the Sega Master System.

Sega Control Stick

Right-handed controller. Replaced the SJ-300/300M. Retailed for $20-$25.  Also available packaged with the SMS cart OutRun (sold together for $45 to $65) or the Rapid Fire Unit.

Sega Handle Controller

Designed for driving/flying games. Only released in Europe.

 

Sega Mega Drive Control Pad - 1650
Sega Mega Drive Control Pad - SJ-3500

Same as 1650 except with a blue start button.

Sega Mega Fire - MK-1657-50
Sega SG Commander

Only released in Europe.  It's basically the same as the original Sega pad except it has two switches which can enable auto-fire for each button.

Sega SJ-150

Standard controller bundled with SG-1000 II consoles. It replaced the SJ-200, and copied its design from the Nintendo Famicom, sporting a D-Pad and two face buttons. The direction pad has a removable thumb stick.

Sega SJ-151

Rare controller and almost identical to the SJ-150 but features round buttons made of hard plastic, as opposed to the SJ-150's oval-shaped rubber buttons. The direction pad has a removable thumb stick. This was released for a short time before the SJ-152.

Sega Joypad - SJ-152

Standard controller for the Sega Mark III console. Features a rounded square pad instead of a circle, as well as a removable thumb stick.  Precursor to the Sega Master System controller.

Sega SJ-200

Came with the SG-1000 console and also sold separately for the SC-3000. Has 2 fire buttons, one on either side.

Sega joystick SJ-300

Made for the SG-1000 console.

Sega joystick SJ-300M

Identical to the SJ-300 except it has blue buttons instead of red.

Sony joystick (model unknown)

Features two sets of fire buttons for left or right-handed players.

Sony Hit Bit joystick controller - JS-55

Marketed for the MXS computer.  Similar to Sega's Control Stick.  Features 3 fire buttons.  Made in Japan and released in 1985.

Sony Hit Bit joystick controller - JS-55E

Identical to the JS-55 except having gray-brown buttons and a b&w label on the top case.  Also no "Made in Japan" sticker on top.

Spectravideo QuickShot VII

A joypad-type controller.

Spital JOY-6MG

Marketed for use with the MSX computer.  Has a switch for auto-fire.

SVI Spectravideo QuickShot - QS-115

Identical to the Spectravideo QuickShot II controller except it has a gray-colored base and a red auto-fire switch.

Spectravideo QuickShot - QS-116

Similar to the SV1, and functions like Roklan's Unroller Controller. Has a switch for auto-fire and a switch for either left or right-handed players.

  Spectravideo QuickShot - QS-118

Another track-ball look-alike joystick controller.

Spectravision/Spectravideo Quick-Shot - 318-101

Original model that features a grip-type joystick with a fire button on top, and another in the upper-left.  This was the world's first ergonomic joystick. It was developed by Harry Fox and Peter Law, and patented in 1982 (U.S. Patent D271220).  The pcb is marked SP318-101.  Made in Hong Kong.  A white version was also made for the MSX computers. Retail price  $14.95.

Spectravision/Spectravideo QuickShot - QuickShot I SV-101

Identical to the Quick-Shot SV-318-101 except for having QuickShot in raised letters on the top of the case, and different writing on the bottom of the case.  The internals are also different.  The pcb inside uses a leaf-switch design and is marked SV 101 MSX Version 4.7 and dated 1985.  Made in Hong Kong.  Retail price  $14.95.

Spectravideo QuickShot II - 318-102

Features a single, large thumb firing button, larger joystick handle and an auto-fire switch on the base with on/off positions.  Retail price $14.95.  A white version was also made, for the MSX computers (under the Spectravideo name).  Released in June 1983.  Identical to the SVI Spectravideo QuickShot II controller with the same model number except it says "Spectravideo" in raised letters on the top of the case, and "Spectravideo" on the bottom. Made in Hong Kong.

SVI Spectravideo QuickShot II - SV-318-102

Identical to the Spectravideo QuickShot II controller with the same model number except it says "QuickShot" in raised letters on the top of the case, and "SVI (R) Spectravideo" on the bottom. Made in Hong Kong.

SVI Spectravideo QuickShot II Plus - SVI-102+

The difference between the II and II Plus models is that the Plus version used microswitches instead of leafswitches.

Spectravideo QuickShot II Turbo - QS-111

Has a switch on the base with 3 settings: auto-fire, manual fire, and CPC 464.  A sticker on the bottom states it was made in Hong Kong.  The internal pcb is marked model SV111A V3 and dated 1987.

Spectravideo QuickShot III SV-103

Designed for the Colecovision.

Spectravideo QuickShot IV Racer

Similar to the Quick-Shot except for a larger ball-topped joystick.

Spectravideo QuickShot V

Similar to the QuickShot III except instead of the keypad, there's a huge fire button.

Spectravideo QuickShot IX Deluxe - SV1

Similar to the QS-116 and functions like Roklan's Unroller Controller. Has a switch for either left or right-handed players.

Spectravideo Quickshot Sportsman
Spectravideo SG Fighter A-Storm - SV-401

Identical to QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick's SG Fighter. Unique 2-button joystick with LEDs and extra controls on the stick. Bottom of the case is marked PATENT NO. 1054353.

  Spectravision Sure-Shot Joystick

Reviewed in the April 1983 issue of Antic.  Described as being similar to Atari's Standard joystick but having 4 suction cups on the bottom and having 2 fire buttons (with one on top of the stick, which is a molded handgrip). This very likely was renamed the original Quick-Shot.

Suncom The Aerobics Joystick

This (red) joystick was designed as an interface between most standard stationary exercise bicycles and an ATARI 2600 or the computers. The joystick can be installed in ten minutes and works best with Activision's Enduro road race game. Retail price was $39.95.

Suncom Slik Stik

Small and simple joystick featuring a small red ball on the top of the joystick. Unlike most joysticks, this one features an internal metal shaft, making it very durable.  Came with a 90-day warranty. Retail price $9.95.

Suncom StarFighter

Subtitled "The Ultimate Joystick". Similar to the Slik Stik but features a bullet-shaped joystick and a 2-year warranty. Retail price $16.95.

Suncom TAC-2

Features 2 fire buttons and the joystick uses a metal ball on base design, making it extremely durable. TAC stands for Totally Accurate Controller. A variant also exists with a white casing.  Retail price $19.95.

Suncom TAC-3 - TATO76

Features leaf switches and 3 fire buttons - one on top of the stick and 2 on the base.

Suncom TAC-5

Uses micro-switches and features a handle that rotated slightly.

Suncom TAC-50

A 4-button joystick that uses micro-switches and featured auto-fire.

Super Soft Terminator The Ultimate Joystick

A very unique controller in that it looks like a grenade!  Made in Denmark.

Suzo Competition Pro Joystick

The original version used leafswitches and had a black stick.  The case was marked "STC Rotterdam" (for Suzo Trading Company).  The company is located in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Although they claim controllers sold in the UK were made in the Netherlands, the original Competition Pro leafswitch joysticks sold there have "Made in the U.S.A. molded in the bottom of the case, with a "Made in the U.K." sticker on top of it.

Suzo Competition Pro Joystick

Same as the original, leafswitch model except it uses microswitches (noted by a sticker on the box) and has a red stick.  This was later known as the Competition Pro 5000, and produced (under license?) by Coin Controls, Inc.

Suzo The Arcade "Joystick" - 29-2008

A single-button joystick, created in Holland by Netherlands-based Suzo, that was popular with MSX owners.  There was also a beige one for the C-64.

Suzo The Arcade Turbo

Similar to the original except for having 2 fire buttons.

  Suzo Prof Competition

Nearly identical to the Competition Pro joystick, except for having a slightly-different stick.

  Suzo Prof Competition 9000

Same as the Prof Competition except for having redesigned fire buttons.

  Suzo Prof Competition 9000 Deluxe

Similar to the Prof Competition except for having an extra fire button on the stick, auto-fire, and suction cups on the base.

Suzo Switch Joy

Features auto-fire.

Syntisa Research Pro-Video Control Grip

Offers "squeeze action firing" and a 15-day trial period with a 1-year warranty. Judging from the photo in the ad, it appears to either use mercury switches for the directions or a movable top, much like the Zircon Video Command. Retail price $29.95.

Tactical Design High Speed Tactical Joystick

Boasts of "high-speed conductive elastomer switches with 24K gold contacts" and a patended velcro/elastic leg belt. Retail price $27.95.

They also advertised a High Speed Switch Kit with all the same parts, I'm guessing to convert a standard Atari joystick, for $9.95.

Tash joystick - TA-50120

Designed for use by handicap persons.  Also sold by Turning Point, and in the U.K. by Tech Cess.

Telegames Super Deluxe

Similar to the Atari Pro-Line joystick, except for an auto-fire switch on the nameplate.

TechnoPlus Swift

Joypad controller that features auto-fire. Identical to the Quickshot game pad.

TG Products Enjoystick

A self-centered joystick, similar to the Odyssey 2, that features a fire button that can be swapped for either left or right-handed players.  Retail price $34.95.

Toshiba joystick HX-J400

Marketed for use with the MSX HX-10 computer.  This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

Ultravision joystick

Was to be the standard controller for the Ultravision Computer Video System.

VJA-260

A Genesis controller clone that's wireless.

Victor joystick HC-J635

Marketed for use with the MSX HX-10 computer.  This was designed by several different manufacturers under different names, model numbers, and colors (Canon, Fujitsu, Gradiente, Panasonic, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Sanyo, Toshiba, Victor).

Video 61 CX-40 Evolved

Another blatant rip-off of Atari's CX-40 joystick.  This one has a red base with 2 fire buttons and "TOP" in large, raised letters on the top.  Retail price $29.95.

Video Peripherals Inc. High Score Tournament Master - HS-15

Strange joystick+joypad hybrid that offers auto-fire and is configured for either right or left-handed players.

Video Peripherals Inc. High ScoreTournament Master - HS-20

Appears to be the same as the HS-15 model.  Retail price $39.95.

Wico Bat Handle - 15-9714

The first of Wico's 'Command Control' series of controllers. It features an extra-long arcade-style bat handle grip, and a switch for using either the base or handle fire button. Came with 1-year limited warranty.  Retail price $29.95.

Wico Bat Handle

A rare variant with an all-black base.

Wico Black Max

Wico The Boss

One of their 'Command Control' series of controllers. Similar to the Power Grip, except it has a different base and lacks the Base/Stick switch.  A variation exists with a yellow button.  Retail price $19.95.

Wico Deluxe joystick - 15-9708

Similar to Wico's Bat Handle joystick except that it features an extra-long arcade-style bat handle grip and a deluxe oversize heavy duty plastic base that slopes toward the player.  Retail price $39.95.

Wico Ergostick

Same as Konix's SpeedKing, except it has a rubber shell over the plastic shell.

Wico Famous Red Ball

One of their 'Command Control' series of controllers. Arcade type red ball handle for the tip of a standard joystick.  Retail price $29.95.

Wico Famous Red Ball

A rare variant with an all-red base.

Wico Grip Handle

One of their 'Command Control' series of controllers.  This is actually a stripped-down version of the Super Three-Way. It is exactly the same stick with the gate lock and all but comes with just the grip handle (you can fit extra ones from both Three-Way sets on it).

Wico joystick/keypad 50-0299

Designed for the Colecovision.

Wico Power Grip - 50-2020

One of their 'Command Control' series of controllers.  Retail price $29.95.

Wico Q Stick

A cheaply-made controller that apparently was only released in France.

Wico Super Three-Way - 50-2002

One of their 'Command Control' series of controllers.  The appeal with this joystick is the trio of interchangeable handles (the grip, the ball, and the bat) complete with their individual fire buttons.  It comes with bat, ball and grip handles.  It was also available as a "bat only" product at one time.  It has a gate lock and the button selector is "1" and "2" (note the difference to "Base" and "Stick" in regular Wicos).  Retail price  $44.95.

Wico Three-Way Deluxe - 50-2010

One of their 'Command Control' series of controllers.  The appeal with this joystick is the trio of interchangeable handles (the grip, the ball, and the bat) complete with their individual fire buttons.  It was also available as a "bat only" product at one time. The ball handle has been replaced with another handle that looks a bit like a car shifter knob. It doesn't have gate lock and the button selector is "F1" and "F1/F2" (= both at once).  Retail price  $44.95.

Winner UFO Joystick

It's called a joystick on the box, but it's a joypad. Features a left thumb directional pad and 2 fire buttons - one marked "Turbo" and the other "A". Produced in at least 2 different colors schemes.

Winner UFO Remote Controller

Same as the UFO except it's wireless.

Zip Stik Competition Joystick

Identical to Euromax's Pro Ace.

Zip Stik Super Pro

Features auto-fire.

Zircon International Video Command - J-3201

Very similar to the Fairchild Channel F grip-style controller, with a triangular-headed stub at the top. Pushing down on the stub serves as the fire button. Retail price $14.95.

Zircon International Video Command - J-3022

A variant. Instead of pushing down on the stub to fire, a small red button near the index finger serves as the fire button. Retail price  $14.95. Box states the controller offers a "new rapid fire button" and the controller had a full 1-year limited warranty.  Retail price $14.95.

Zircon International Video Command Plus

Another variant with a red case and a round, chrome handle.  Retail price $14.95.

Zircon International Z-Stick

Similar to the Video Command controller but is chrome-colored and offers 2 methods of control - the Maze Control allows for only 4-way control, and the Speed Control allows players to slow down their movements by 50%. It also offers auto-fire. Retail price $29.95.

(manufacturer unknown)

Features a retractable cord, similar to Championship Electronics controllers.

(manufacturer unknown)

A Taiwan variant of the Commodore 1311 joystick.

(manufacturer unknown)

Similar to the Bebek joystick except it only has 2 fire buttons (both on the base), the top-half of the joystick is a solid piece of red plastic, and the trim design around the base of the  joystick is different.

(manufacturer unknown)

A hexagon-shaped joystick with 2 square fire buttons (both on the base).

(manufacturer unknown)
(manufacturer unknown)

 

(manufacturer unknown)

Features triangular-shaped firing buttons on the base, similar to some Commodore controllers.

(manufacturer unknown)
(manufacturer unknown)

 

(manufacturer unknown)

Contoured base designed to fit in your hand, with 3 fire buttons and what might be an auto-fire switch.

(manufacturer unknown)

Another 2-button Atari standard variant.  The base looks similar to Atari's standard joystick except the top of the base doesn't have the raised dashes and instead has a raised, smooth area. The rubber boot and joystick are identical to Rinco's joystick.

(manufacturer unknown)

Here's what appears to be an unknown Wico variant, but there's enough differences with it to make me think it's some knockoff:

It has a bat handle, but the button is black, not white.

The "arrows" around the base of the joystick look similar to those from the Grip Handle and Super Three-Way models.

The raise base around the joystick is square not round like most Wico controllers, although The Boss has a similar square base.

The auto-fire switch is on the bottom, not the top like every other Wico controller with one.

There's no name or text on the bottom of the base, unlike every other Wico controller.

Wico controllers say "WICO" in raised letters on the controller plug. That one has a circle (3rd picture), similar to a Suncom controller plug.

The raised stress-relief area on the controller wire at the base is squared, not round like most Wico controllers. The location on most Wico controllers is closer to the corner.

There are 2 fire buttons on the base. The only Wico controller I know of that has that is the Q Stick, which doesn't even resemble any other Wico controllers (and was probably something that Wico either sub-contracted for, or licensed and put their name on it. Similar to what they did with the Ergostick).
 

(manufacturer unknown) Action Joystick

Nearly identical to the Commodore VG-115 joystick with auto-fire.  The bottom of the case is marked PATENTED NO:9391.  The pcb is marked VG-125-06 AQ TL.

(manufacturer unknown) ADS

Made in Yugoslavia (now Slovenia). The joystick handle is the same type that was used on skiing poles! The "switches were simply pieces of aluminum that were pushed together, making reliability quite poor.

(manufacturer unknown) Alien Blaster

Similar to some of Suzo's controllers, and could possibly be made by them.  Features what appears to be an auto-fire switch.

(manufacturer unknown) Captain Grant

All-in-1 combination joystick+paddle controller.

(manufacturer unknown) Challenger Turbo Deluxe Joystick Controller

Huge ball-top joystick with fire buttons on either side of the ball, and 2 more on the base.  Features micro-switches and auto-fire.  One slide switch is marked "Auto Off" and the other is for the speed of the auto fire ("1", "2", and "3").  The sticker at the top of the base is in German.  The box has a photo of a red model with black fire buttons and switches.

(manufacturer unknown) Cobra

Has 2 buttons and auto-fire. There are 4 suction cups on the bottom.

(manufacturer unknown) "Competition Pro" replica

Sold from Spain on Ebay as a Competition Pro replica, although it doesn't resemble any known joystick.  Has 2 square buttons and what appears to be an auto-fire switch.  There are 4 suction cups on the bottom.

(manufacturer unknown) Competition Pro

Nearly identical to the Commodore VG-115 joystick but without auto-fire.  The pcb is marked VG-125-01 AQ TL.

(manufacturer unknown) Conector

Identical to the Bondwell Quickshot Python 3.

(manufacturer unknown) Crack Shot Super Joystick

Identical to the Dismarc Superstick.

(manufacturer unknown) Delta 2000

A microswitch controller featuring 2 fire buttons, with a large one on top of the joystick. Included an adaptor for Spectrum Plus 2/Plus 3 computers.

(manufacturer unknown) Fantastick
  (manufacturer unknown) Grip Controller

Made in Hong Kong, this stick looks a little like the Video Command Joystick by Zircon but isn't marked with a manufacturer.

(manufacturer unknown) Joy Stick

Another blatant ripoff of Atari's standard joystick, which looks identical to the Commodore VIC-20 joystick except for having a sticker that says "JOY STICK".

(manufacturer unknown) Joystick 505
(manufacturer unknown) Master Shot
(manufacturer unknown) MK3000 Joy Stick

Marketed for use with the MSX computer.

(manufacturer unknown) Quick Gun Joyball / Datex Joy Ball

Another large ball-top joystick controller with micro-switches and auto-fire that features 6 fire buttons (half marked "Quick" and the other half "Normal".  The name on the box is Quick Gun Joyball but the name on the top of the case says Datex Joy Ball.

(manufacturer unknown) Quicksilver

A baseless joystick that has a suction cup on the bottom. It uses mercury switches.

(manufacturer unknown) Super Professional Joystick

Knockoff of Coin Control's Competition Pro joystick, except for having black base, buttons, and joystick handle, and red top case.

  (manufacturer unknown) The Turbo

Basically a clone of Spectravision's Quickshot II Plus joystick, with the addition of 2 extra buttons on the base.

(manufacturer unknown) Turbo Ball

 

(manufacturer unknown) Turbo Junior

Similar in style to the Commodore VG-115 joystick.

(manufacturer unknown) Turbo Junior II

Paddles

 

Atari Electronica LTDA Controle Reostato

Knockoff of Atari's standard paddle controller.

Atari Paddle Controllers - CX30-04

Standard paddle controller that used a potentiometer and a microswitch for the fire button. These were manufactured in pairs, with both controllers being connected to a single plug. The controllers are durable, but the pots require periodic cleaning. 2 different versions exist. The original version released in 1977 has a different label with the Atari name and logo next to large tennis rackets. The product number is also different (CX30-04).  Retail price $21.95.

  Atari Paddle Controllers - CX30

Released in 1978, this is identical to the original version except the label has "paddle" in place of the Atari name and logo, with slightly smaller tennis rackets. The model is also shorter (CX30).  Retail price $21.95.

Coleco Dual Command

Combination joystick+paddle. Description: "Advanced Controller Set with Built-in Joystick & Paddle. Now your customers can play all Atari 2600 VCS compatible games requiring joystick or paddle with one set of controllers. The DUAL COMMAND controllers were designed with a responsive, omni-directional joystick and side-mounted fire buttons, plus a rotary paddle control. These inexpensive high-quality controllers plug right into the control ports of the Atari 2600 VCS, or ColecoVision Expansion Module #1. They're also original equipment replacements for Coleco's Gemini Video Game System. To switch from joystick to paddle, just use the included Wye connector. The DUAL COMMAND controllers offer improved control at a price that's right!"

Coleco Gemini Video Game System

Combination joystick+paddle.

Commodore VIC-20 Paddle - 1312

Identical to Atari's paddles except the top-half of the controller shell is white and there's no sticker below the knob (or an indentation for it); instead, "Commodore" appears in raised silver lettering above the knob. The potentiometer inside the VIC-20's paddle controllers uses a 470k-Ohm resistor while that of the Atari is 1000-Ohm. This gives the VIC-20 paddles a slightly wider "sweep" range. Although no model number was printed on the packaging for Commodore paddles, the Atari style white paddles were give the designation VIC-1312 in some product lists. The name on the box is "Paddle" (singular) although these are a set.

Commodore VIC-20 Paddles - 1341

A unique paddle with a dark gray, angled shell and a large, rectangular fire button above the knob. The knob is similar to Atari's paddle, except it's light gray. This was possibly done to match either the C16 or the C64, although the box still has the same VIC-20 styling, but the name is corrrectly plural ("Paddles").

Dactar paddles

Bundled with the Dactar II Video Game (case) system.

Digivision Robby paddle

Bundled with the Digivision console.

  Dismac

Packaged with Dismac's VCS/2600 clone.  From the photo it appears the paddle controller uses the same shell as a standard joystick, but with a pot+knob in place of the joystick.

Dynacom

Rare paddle controller that featured suction cups on the base. It was only available in Brazil. Description from ad: "The control of strong emotions. The Dynacom Paddle Controller is the only unique rotary controller for video games that allows precise and highly reliable shots. The Paddle Controller can be used in Dynavision and other games compatible with the Atari system. To ensure strong emotions with your Paddle Controller, the following games are already available."

 

Gemini Paddle Controllers

Identical to Atari's paddles, except there's no sticker below the knob (or an indentation for it); instead, "GEMINI" appears in raised lettering above the knob. "MADE IN TAIWAN" is molded in raised letters on the bottom.

Sears Standard Controllers - CX30

Made by Atari for the Sears Tele-Games Video Arcade system.  Identical to Atari's paddles except for the packaging and label.

  Sears Video Arcade II joystick/paddle

Made by Atari for the Sears Tele-Games Video Arcade II system.  They sold them with their 2800 system.  Sold as a pair and featuring combination joystick+paddle controls.

  Telegames Paddle Controls

Nearly-identical to Atari's paddles, except there's no sticker below the knob (or an indentation for it); instead, "PADDLE" appears above the knob in raised lettering.

 

Vecor Video Game Paddle Controls - 2335

Nearly-identical to Atari's paddles, except there's a gold sticker with black lettering with "PADDLE" across the top.

Vecor Paddle Controllers

Nearly-identical to Atari's paddles, except with a white case and a sticker with "Vecor" across the top.

  Video 61 CX-30 Evolved

Nothing more than a hacked set of paddles that use the shells from Atari's CX24 Pro-Line joysticks. Retail price $39.95.

  (unknown)

Nearly-identical to Atari's paddles, except instead of where the sticker would be (below the knob), "PADDLE" appears in large, raised lettering.

  (unknown)

White with gray knobs, with what appears to be a right-handed fire button.

Trackballs

 

Accu Company Accuball

Rather uncommon trak-ball controller.

Atari Trak-Ball - CX22

One of Atari's "Pro-Line" Advanced Controllers. This was announced in the Jan/Feb '83 issue of the Atari Age as due out by that summer, and a company flyer notes it was "coming in June '83"; the May/June '83 issue of the Atari Age noted it would be available in July for $44.95. The original version has a white ball, round fire buttons, and an all-black case and includes "Pro-Line" in the name on the top. Although the case has a hole and markings on the left side for a Trak-Ball/joystick mode switch, the pcb design doesn't support it (and the hole is covered up). The 2nd version has a white base (and no "Pro-Line" text on top) and the pcb has the mode switch. Since Atari never released a VCS game that actually supported a true Trak-Ball (i.e. analog) mode, the controller operates the same as a joystick. Designed by Dan Kramer and Levon Mitchell.  Early case designs were done by Tom Palecki.

Atari Trak-Ball - CX80

Redesigned "XL-style" model (black ball, triangular fire buttons). The mode switch is now on the back and is marked "JS" (for joystick) and "TB" (for Trak-Ball). Note that there are 2 different (internal) versions of this model as well - the 1st is compatible with the CX-22; the 2nd is compatible with the Atari ST mouse (some jumpers were added to the board inside). The only way to tell which version you have is to either try it, or open it up and look for the jumpers. Since Atari never released a VCS game that actually supported a true Trak-Ball (i.e. analog) mode, the controller operates the same as a joystick. Designed by Dan Kramer, Levon Mitchell, and Barry Marshall. The case was designed by Tom Palecki.

Marjac Joyball Trackball Action Controller

Looks nearly-identical to the Wico Trackball, except for the lack of raised lettering and higher edging around the fire button.

Sega Sports Pad

2 versions exist.  One has a switch for selecting between Sega Sports Pad mode and joystick mode.  When in joystick mode, it works with Atari games in place of standard joystick.

TG Products Track Ball Controller AKA Trak Ball Controller- TB-600

Announced at the Winter 1983 CES and shown at the Summer 1983 CES, but apparently never released. According to company literature, their track ball controller was modeled after the $1,200 track balls used to train U.S. astronauts.  Ted Gilliam, founder and president of TG Products, says his company plans to market many other new products during 1983 (InfoWorld, February 14th, 1983, pg. 28); one, he says, will be "a totally revolutionary joystick" designed to fit Atari joystick-compatible computers and video game systems.  The April 11th, 1983 issue of InfoWorld (pg. 26) has an article and a review of the prototype track ball controller, which only had 1 button.  The October 1983 issue of Electronic Games is the only publication that stated a different product number (TTB-800) and says it has a pair of action buttons. It also mentioned TG made a version for the Apple II and IBM PC with 3 fire buttons.  The April 1984 issue of Computer Games (pg. 9) mentioned TG Products shelved their plans to release Atari-compatible trackball controllers but has released the Apple II and IBM PC models.  Retail price $64.95.

Wico Trackball - 72-4545

One of their 'Command Control' series of controllers. This doesn't output true analog signals, only digital.  Retail price $69.95.

Zircon International Track-Ball

A red-cased controller that offers dual fire buttons (for both right and left-handed players) and variable auto-fire. A prototype was shown in the November 1983 issue of Electronic Fun (pg. 6). The October 1983 issue of Video Games (pg. 36) mentioned it was the lowest-priced trackball controller at the Summer CES show at $29.95. The April 1984 issue of Computer Games (pg. 9) mentioned Zircon shelved their plans to release Atari-compatible trackball controllers.

Keypads

 

Atari Keyboard Controller - CX50

For use with the BASIC Programming cartridge and a few others.

Atari Kids' Controller - CX23

An oversized keypad controller similar in function to the Keyboard Controller and Video Touch Pad. Designed for use with the Children's Television Workshop (CCW) games. It seems someone in Atari's marketing department forgot a basic rule of grammar in regards to plural possessive - specifically on using an apostrophe correctly in plural nouns. Early marketing had the name spelled correctly (Kids') but the released version doesn't (Kid's). 

Atari Video Touch Pad - CX21

Redesigned keyboard controller that was included with Star Raiders. This is the only game with an overlay specifically designed for this controller.  Retail price $21.95.

Dynacom Basic Keyboard
Sears Tele-Games Keyboard Controllers - CX50

Identical to Atari's Keyboard Controller.

Sears Tele-Games Video Touch Pad - CX21

Identical to Atari's Video Touch Pad.

Specialty Controllers

 

  Accu-Tech Products Accu-Play Control Board

Mentioned in the October 1982 issue of Creative Computing (pg. 209).  Retail price $29.95.

Amiga Joyboard - 3120

The full name for this was The Joyboard Power Body Controller. It's a large, flat, black board with red lettering that you stand on to control your games. By rocking back and forth and side-to-side, you simulate the joystick motions. An additional port in the Joyboard allows you to plug in a stick for use with games that need a button. Packaged with Mogul Maniac.

Atari Driving Controllers - CX20-01

Packaged with the game Indy 500/Race, which was the only game to officially support it, although a few homebrew games do as well (Stell-A-Sketch, Stella's Stocking, and Thrust Plus: Driving Controller Edition).  2 different versions exist.  The original version released in 1977 has a label with the Atari name and logo next a large Indy car.  A few homebrew games also support it (Stell-A-Sketch, Stella's Stocking, and Thrust Plus: Driving Controller Edition).  Retail price $21.95/pair.

Atari Driving Controllers - CX20

Released in 1978, this is identical to the original version except the label has "driving" in place of the Atari name and logo, with a slightly smaller Indy car.  Retail price $21.95/pair.

Atari Track & Field Controller - CA025462-001

Designed by Wico. Packaged with the Track & Field cartridge. Also works well with Activision's Decathlon, as well as any "slide and shoot" games like Space Invaders.

Atari XE Light Gun

Designed for use with VCS/2600, 7800, and XE (computer) light gun games.

BC-Systems BC Blaster

An all-button controller with an Asteroids-style layout and "Super Rapid-Fire". Advertised in magazines for $29.95.

Best Electronics The Best Atari Light Gun
CBS Games Booster Grip

Packaged with Omega Race, this attachment adds an additional fire button to a standard Atari 2600 joystick. It fits over the joystick and has a cable with an inline connector on it; you plug the joystick into one end, and the other end plugs into the system. The trigger button is wired up to the Paddle A line (pin 5) and the +5v (pin 7). This becomes your fire button. The other 2 buttons are for thrust.

Exus Foot Craz

Packaged with the games Video Jogger and Video Reflex.

  Garden & Green Co. Video Fitness System

A specially-designed joystick controller for use while exercising, and included a list of recommended games to use. The controller has a switch for either single or double fire. The company was based in Berwyn, IL, and had a patent pending for this. From a brochure: "Put real meaning into the time you spend video-gaming. And put your computer/video game equipment to the best use yet: your personal fitness and health. Video Fitness System lets your body "talk" to computers to control the action on the screen. Your body will reward you by getting into the shape you've always wanted. You can use VFS with almost any game cartridge that gives you a thrill." Suggested retail price was $79.90.

Milton Bradley Cosmic Commander - 4362

Packaged with the game Survival Run.  It's nothing more than a glorified joystick controller, and not a very good one. Difficult to find, especially in working condition.

Milton Bradley Flight Commander - 4363

Packaged with the game Spitfire Attack.  It's nothing more than a glorified joystick controller, and not a very good one. Difficult to find, especially in working condition.

KY Enterprises FingerTip Controller

Similar to the Starplex but more cheaply built. Came with a 2-year warranty. Retail price $19.95. A Colecovision model was also made, and retailed for $22.95.

KY Enterprises Hand/Wrist Joystick Controller - 101

Controller designed for the disabled.  Same as the FingerTip Controller.  Retail price $20.

KY Enterprises Hand/Wrist Joystick Controller - 102

Controller designed for the disabled.  Similar to the FingerTip Controller except that it includes paddle, Select, and Reset controls.  A left-handed model was also available.  Retail price $45.

KY Enterprises Head Switch - 105

Controller designed for the disabled.  Retail price $30.

QJ (QuickJoy) Quality Joystick Footpedal - SV-129

Connects between the system and the joystick/joypad. You select which joystick movements (up to 3) are made by the pedal by configuring the appropriate switches on the pedal.

Quest Industries Inc. Questar I Button Console - QC-I

Features leaf switch button controller with an Asteroids-style layout. Retail price $34.95.

R.H. Design - Star Trak

An all-button controller that features auto-fire and "burst-fire".

Sears Driving Controllers - CX20-01

Made by Atari for the Sears Tele-Games Video Arcade system and packaged with the Race game.  Identical to Atari's paddles except for the packaging and label.

Starplex Electronics, Inc. Video Game Controller/Deluxe Video Game Controller

An all-button controller with an Asteroids-style layout. The controller is very responsive and works great for Asteroids and Space Invaders (like they are in the arcade).  It also has a switch which selects between Normal and Astroblast (auto-fire).  On the back there is a panel to insert a AA battery, which is needed for auto-fire (why it doesn't simply use the +5v controller pin from the console, we don't know).  Some boxes show a silver overlay (with the name "Starplex Controller") which does exist, but the wood grain version (with the name "Video Game Controller") is more common. Retail price  $29.95.

Suncom Joy-Sensor Joystick Simulator

This controller somewhat resembles an Intellivision controller, but there isn't actually a disc at the bottom. Instead, a sensor "reads" your finger and responds accordingly onscreen. 2 different versions exist, but the differences appear cosmetic. Suncom revived this design in the 16-bit era with the "Turbo Touch 360" controller. Retail price $34.95.

Suncom Joy-Sensor for Colecovision
Tash button controller

Large button controller in the shape of a D-pad.  Designed for use by handicap persons.  Also sold by Turning Point, and in the U.K. by Tech Cess.

Tash button controller

Button controller in the shape of a wing.  Designed for use by handicap persons.  Also sold by Turning Point, and in the U.K. by Tech Cess.

Transcriber Co. Faster Blaster

An unusual keypad-type controller with 5 buttons (shield, thrust, left, right, and fire-replay).  Sold for less than $15.

Wico button controller

A rare 5-button controller.

Auto-Fire Modules

 

Discwasher PointMaster Fire Control

Rapid-fire module that connects between the joystick and the console and operates at a pre-set rate.  Retail price $9.94.

Gammation Fire Power

Rapid-fire module that connects between the joystick and the console and operates at a pre-set rate.

Gammation Fire Power 100

Allows variable rates of rapid fire by adjusting a potentiometer.

Gemini Rapid Fire - VG169

Allows variable rates of rapid fire by adjusting a potentiometer. Looks like a knock-off of Questar's Blaster module.  These were selling for $2.99 at Kay-Bee Toys.

Quest Industries Inc. Blaster! Auto-Fire Module - QC-110

Same as Quest Star Blaster, just in a redesigned case. Retail price $12.95.

Quest Industries Inc. Quest Star Blaster

Allows variable rates of rapid fire by adjusting a potentiometer. Advertised for 14.95.

Sega Rapid Fire Unit - RF-150

Also known as the Rapid Fire in Brazil.  The switches control the 2 fire buttons found on Sega controllers.  In North America this unit was offered by Sega via their early "Team Sega" newsletters.  Buying three games would get you a rapid fire unit, though it was also available to purchase separately in stores.  It was also packaged with Sega's Control Stick under the name "Rapid Fire Control Stick".

Texas Hi Tech, Inc. Lazer Quick Fire!

Allows variable rates of rapid fire by adjusting a potentiometer.

(manufacturer unknown) Rapid Fire

Rapid-fire module that connects between the joystick and the console and operates at a pre-set rate. Looks like a knock-off of Discwasher's PointMaster Fire Control module. Back of it says "Made in Hong Kong".

Accessories

 

Alpha Triggerstik (pair)

Originally sold as a pair. This slid over a standard Atari joystick and added an extra fire button on the top. Retail price $9.95

Atari Robotron joystick coupler

Originally packaged in a large box that opened to reveal a built-in controller holder that held 2 joysticks together in an attempt to simulate the arcade experience.

C&T Creations Fyre-Ball FB-2 (pair)

Same as those made by Pusher. Retail price $3.75.

Cable Concepts, Inc. Joylink

10' joystick extension cable. Retail price $14.95.

Carter-Craft Game "Y" Adapter

Allows 2 joysticks to be connected to 1 controller port.

  CBS Games Grabber Balls (pair)

Sold as a pair. Same as those made by Pusher.

  CBS Games Joystick Stand
Coleco Gemini Dual Command 'Y' adapter

Since the system only has 2 controller ports, a set of Y adapters were included to allow 2 of the combo controllers to share one port (for paddle games with 2 or more players). The CBS system (which is a relabled Gemini) also used these.

Darbe Products The Ball

Sold as a pair. Same as those made by Pusher. Retail Price $3.95.

Electronic Games (manufacturer unknown)

Look identical to those made by Pusher (and probably made by them). This was an advertising item for a video game store in Brazil called Electronic GAMES.

Gemini Gemgrip Joystick Balls

Sold as a pair. Same as those made by Pusher.

The Grand Stand Company The 'Grand' Stand

Advertised as a "joystick stabilizer support and score enhancer".  Made of walnut.  Controllers had to be screwed to the base.  Retail price $34.95 each or 2 for $64.95.

J. E. Koch & Co. Joystick Replacement Insert

Replacement plastic insert for Atari standard joystick controllers. Retail price $4.35.

K.M.S. Enterprises The Gamers Edge

An attachment for Atari Standard joysticks that provides a wider base. Retail price $6.99 or $12 for 2.

Kay Enterprises Stick Stand

For standard Atari joystick controllers. Includes Fastball Easy-Grip Control Knob.

  Pusher Grabber Balls (pair)

Not as unpleasant as the name suggests - this accessory merely attaches to the top of a standard stick and turns it into an "arcade"-like controller. The company went by the trademarked name Push-A-Matic in their ads.

  Questar Joy Stick Reducer

A reverse 'Y' cable that allows 1 joystick to be connected to 2 controller ports.

R. Dobson & Co. The Advantage

A plastic holder that you insert an Atari standard controller or similarly-sized controller into. It has flaps that you sit on, which holds the device in place.  Retail price $14.95.

Sega Joystick Coupler

Packaged with the game Spy Hunter to allow both joysticks to snap into one unit.

Skywriter Stick Station

Basically a plank of wood with a hole in the center that holds a standard-size Atari joystick. Sold for $14.95 and available in both poplar or walnut finish.

Ok, so what's the REAL purpose of this? How does converting a handheld controller into an arcade control panel help your scores? It's not going to eliminate hand cramps and wrist fatigue, it's only going to exacerbate it. Plus, having a 3 pound board in your lap can't be all that comfortable. And I'm sure parents loved it when their little gamer used it to swat a sibling, friend, or family pet. Besides, as anyone who's been called to the principal's office will tell you, the last thing a kid wants to see is a board, especially one that's been customized to reduce airflow. Yeah, this has bad idea written all over it... or at least it should have. And if the preceding reasons weren't enough, consider paying $15 for a piece of wood with a hole in it.

Sullivan Enterprises Command Stand

A 22" high plastic pedestal on which you Velcro your controller. Retail price $29.95 for a set of 2.

Suncon "Lefty" Joystick Adapter

Converts joysticks to left-handed use. Retail price $6.95.

Suncon 5' Joystick extension cable

Retail price $5.95.

Tammy Sue Distributing Video Rack

Similar to the Stick Station, except it has a larger hole for different controllers. Retail price $12.95.

Ultra Tech Distributors 12' Extension - 1003

Retail price $3.95.

Ultra Tech Distributors Lefty Joystick Adapter - 1009

Converts joysticks to left-handed use. Retail price $3.95.

Video Peripherals Inc. joystick base - HS 1 and HS 2

A weighted base that holds Atari or Colecovision joysticks. Model HS 2 holds 2 controllers. Retail price $6.95.

Wico 6' Video System Extension Cord - #15-1755

Wico 12' Video System Extension Cord - #15-1756


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