MAGAZINES

 

LINK to various Atari magazines on Atarimania.
LINK to torrents for various UK magazines.

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A.N.A.L.O.G. Computing

By A.N.A.L.O.G. 400/800 Magazine

One of two premiere magazines devoted to the Atari 8-bit and ST computers.  It ran for 79 issues, from 1981 to 1989.  A.N.A.L.O.G. stood for Atari Newsletter And Lots Of Games.

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Antic The Atari Resource

By Antic Publishing

One of two premiere magazines devoted to the Atari 8-bit and ST computers.  It ran for 88 issues, from 1982 to 1990.

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Atari Age

By Atari Inc.

Behold, the hallowed pages of Atari Age, Atari's own dedicated publication.  It was published bi-monthly (until the very end), and based in Philadelphia, PA (here's a PHOTO of the building) for all but the last 2 issues.  The editor was Steve Morgenstern (aka Captain Steve), who went on to write for several other publications (Rolling Stone, Popular Science, Playboy, Cigar Aficionado, AARP, etc) after Atari Age folded.  In retrospect we can now see the sheer advertising gimmick that it was, but no Atari fan can deny the thrill of seeing what these wizards of gaming had in store for us next.  Also included are the 2 incredibly rare newsletter-style issues (based in CA) that pre-date the more well-known magazine style, as well as some bonus materials.

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Atari Club Magazin

By Atari Inc.

This is Germany's version of Atari Age.

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The Atari Connection

By Atari Inc.

Originally called The Atari Connection, this was Atari's own dedicated magazine for users of their home computers and was published quarterly by Atari's "Products Company" division.  The magazine was cancelled within days of the Tramiel takeover.

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Atari Explorer

By Atari Corp. / Atari Explorer Publications Corp.

Originally headed by Neil Harris and subtitled "The Official Atari Journal", this magazine covered the 8-bit and 16-bit Atari computers.  The first issue came out in February 1985 and the final issue was Jan/Feb 1993.  Bill Skruch and Shiraz Shivji were two of the advisory board members, and over the years the magazine featured contributions from several  industry luminaries such as Chris Crawford, Bill Wilkinson, Arnie Katz, Bill Kunkel, and Joyce Worley.  David H. Ahl (founder of Creative Computing magazine) took over as editor in June 1986, which is when the magazine really hit its stride.  A few months later, the magazine was being produced by a new subsidiary, Atari Explorer Publications Corp, which was headed by David Ahl.  The magazine went on hiatus on March 15, 1990.  When it resumed early the following year, it was being headed by John Jainschigg and published in-house at Atari. 

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Atarian

By Atarian Explorer Publications Corp.

Based in Mendham, NJ, this magazine was Atari's response to Nintendo's Nintendo Power magazine.  Sadly, it only lasted for 3 issues.

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Big K

By IPC Magazines Ltd.

Based in London, this magazine's focus was mainly on home computers, especially those from the U.K.  Most issues included a cassette that contained programs for various computers, and the magazine also featured the very first digital comic, "Shatter", which was created on an Acorn computer.  It only ran for 1 year - exactly 12 issues.

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Black Enterprise

By Earl G. Graves Publishing Company, Inc.

Primarily a business news and investment resource for African Americans.  2 relevant articles concerning video games from 2 issues can be found here, featuring such luminaries as Fairchild's Channel F designer and Video Soft founder Jerry Lawson and APF Electronics' MP 1000 designer Edward Smith.

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Blip

By Marvel Comics

A short-lived video game magazine that was printed in comic book-style format, and on the same type of paper (which made for some rather low-quality photos).  It premiered in February 1983 and ended in August that same year.

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Classic Gamer Magazine

By Chris Cavanaugh

At the height of the video game fanzine craze, Chris took self-publishing to the next level and created CGM, which was one of the few, great "indie" magazines that popped up in the late 1990s.

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Computer & Video Games

By EMAP National Publications Ltd.

Quite possibly the first magazine devoted to video games in the world.  Based in the UK, it debuted in November 1981 and ran until October 2004, at which point it switched to a web-based format.  It's currently owned and published by Future Publishing, who re-launched the magazine under the new name CVG Presents in 2008 (which folded the following year), however the CVG website is still active.

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Computer Gamer

By Argus Specialist Publications, Ltd.

This UK-based magazine ran from April 1985 to June 1987.

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Creative Computing

By Ahl Computing, Inc.

Founded by renowned Publisher and Editor-in-Chief David H. Ahl, the first issue hit the stands in November/December 1974.  By the time it became a monthly magazine in 1979, it claimed to be the "#1 magazine of computer applications and software".  By the time it ceased publication, in December 1985, issues were typically 300+ pages in size.

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Creative Computing Video & Arcade Games

By Ahl Computing, Inc.

Renowned Creative Computing magazine creator David H. Ahl started this well-written but very short-lived spin-off dedicated to video games.  How short-lived?  It lasted exactly 2 issues.

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Electronic Fun with Computers & Games / Computer Fun

By Fun & Games Publishing Inc.

Similar to Electronic Games, but with writing and articles aimed at an older audience.  Ran from November 1982 to March 1984, after which it changed its name to Computer Fun and ran for 2 more issues before folding.

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Electronic Games / Computer Entertainment

By Reese Publishing Co., Inc.

Arnie Katz, Bill Kunkel, and Joyce Worley.  Those 3 names will forever be synonymous with what was widely regarded as the most-popular classic video game magazine of its time.  It was also the first magazine in the U.S. devoted to the subject of electronic games, and set the standard for the scores of imitators that soon followed.  It debuted in Winter of 1981 and ran until April 1985 when its name was changed to Computer Entertainment.  It only lasted 4 issues under that name before folding.  It was reborn in the early 1990s, but it never recaptured its former glory.

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Electronics For Kids

By Charleston Publishing Co.


 

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Enter

By Children's Television Workshop

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Esquire

By Esquire Publishing Inc.

Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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Gameliner

By Control Video Corporation

This was CVC's own magazine, devoted to their VCS/2600 GameLine Master Module device.  It only ran for 2 issues.  The 3rd issue was not a glossy magazine but rather one page of notes and a revised game listing, accompanied by simplified instructions for games recently added to their GameLine library.

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Games

By Kappa Publishing Group, Inc.

This magazine is best known for traditional games and puzzles, but occasionally covered video games in the 1980s, and even when they didn't, they featured several ads for video games or controllers (they also featured several ads for cigarettes and alcohol.  Go figure.).  Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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I/O

By Atari (UK) Inc.

This was the official magazine for Atari's UK home computer club.  By issue 4 the abbreviation was dropped in favor of the full spelling (Input/Output), but the magazine only lasted 5 issues.

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IEEE spectrum

By The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.

This began publishing in January 1964 as a successor to Electrical Engineering. Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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Interface Age

By

This was published between August 1976 to December 1982.  Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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JoyStik - How to Win at Video Games

By Publications International Ltd.

Easily the most artistic game magazine ever created, and unique in the fact that it features no ads.  It's also known for featuring a column by the world's first professional home video game player, Todd Rogers.  The first issue debuted in September 1982.  The December 1982 issue was a special issue devoted to home games. Starting with Volume 2, the subtitle was changed to "How to Win At Home, Computer & Arcade Games".  Sadly, the magazine only lasted for 10 issues.

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K Power

By Scholastic Inc.

Devoted entirely to computers with an emphasis on education, this magazine only lasted 8 issues before merging with Family Computing.

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L'Atarien (The Atarian)

By Rive Ouest - Cato Johnson France

This was France's version of Atari Age and was published by Rive Ouest - Cato Johnson France" on behalf of "PECF Atari France".  "PECF" was the nickname of the company "Productions et Editions Cinematographiques Francaises", a company 100% owned by Warner Communications.  It launched in late 1983 and was bi-monthly until June 1984, when it went on hiatus until December of that year. From that point, the focus changed to Atari's home computers.  Like Atari Age, only 11 issues were made, with February 1986 being the final issue.

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Leisure Time Electronics

By Charleston Publishing Co.

Subtitled "The Buyers' Guide To All Leisure Electronic Products".  This was a large-format magazine that was published monthly.

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Microkids

By Microkids Publishing

Decent albeit very short-lived magazine that focused on home computers but also has articles everything from computer camps to arcade games.  Also featured a column by "The Vid Kid" Rawson Stovall, who was famous for being the first nationally-syndicated reviewer of video games in the United States.  By July 1984 the magazine merged with K Power.

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Mundo Atari (Atari World)

By SES System

This Atari magazine was based in Chile and ran for 25 issues, from May 1987 to August/September 1989.

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Personal Computer Games

By VNU Business Publications

This UK-based magazine was a spinoff of Personal Computer World and Personal Computer News.  It only ran for 15 issues.

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Playboy Guide Electronic Entertainment

By Playboy Enterprises, Inc.

Much like the old Video magazine, coverage mostly pertains to TVs, VCRs, and stereo.  Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.  It's unknown exactly how many different issues were published, but it appears only 4 were published, as all 4 have been found in bookbinding form.

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Popular Mechanics

By The Hearst Corporation

Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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ROM

By Peter Ellison

An independent Atari-only magazine based in Canada and printed bi-monthly.

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Softline / St. Game

By Softalk Publishing Inc.

Although initially aimed at Apple II owners, they eventually featured articles and ads for Atari and Commodore computer owners.  The first issue came out in September 1981, and by the March/April 1984 issue the name was changed to St. Game, which might have been the last issue.

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Software Merchandising

By Eastman Publishing Company, Inc.

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Syzygy Magazine

By Jason W. Cody

An independent magazine that billed itself as "the only hardcore eclectic video game magazine".  How eclectic?  It only ran for 4 issues.

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Tilt

By World Editions

The first French video game magazine.  It ran from September 1982 to January 1994.

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Time

By Time, Inc.

Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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TV Gamer

By Boytonbrook, Ltd.

Another London-based magazine.  It started off covering home video games for Atari, Intellivision, Colecovision, and Vectrex, but soon started covering home computers.  Only 14 issues were produced.

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TV Guide

By Triangle Publications, Inc.

A weekly magazine that features TV program listings and related news, in publication since 1953.  Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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Video

By Reese Publishing Co., Inc.

Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.  All the Arcade Alley columns can be found HERE.  This magazine is also note-worthy establishing the Arcade Awards.  First announced in February 1980, they honored the best electronic software and hardware up to that time.  Subsequent years only considered games released in the previous 12 months.  The awards later became known as "Arkies" when Electronic Games magazine became the co-sponsor of them in 1982.

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Video Games

By Pumpkin Press, Inc.

An excellent magazine, aside from the occasional vodka ads, that started bi-monthly in 1982 and became monthly in 1983.  The last issue we know of was the Summer/Fall 1984 one.

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Video Games Player / Computer Games

By Carnegie Publications Corp.

A bi-monthly magazine that ran from Fall 1982 to October/November 1983 before changing its name to Computer Games.  It ran under that name for another 7 issues, from December/January 1984 to January/February 1985.

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Video Magazine

By Phono Publishing Co.

An Italian magazine similar to Video or Video Review.  Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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Video Review

By Viare Publishing

Since there's very little information regarding video games, the issues here only contain those pages that are relevant.

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Videogaming Illustrated / Videogaming and Computer Gaming Illustrated / Video and Computer Gaming Illustrated

By Ion International, Inc.

Ran from August 1982 to April 1983 before undergoing a make-over and resurfacing as Videogaming and Computer Gaming Illustrated.  It ran under that name from June 1983 to December 1983, after which it was again renamed!  Starting in January 1984, it was now called Video and Computer Gaming Illustrated.  Unfortunately, only one other issue was produced (March 1983), after which the magazine finally folded.

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Vidiot

By Creem Magazine, Inc.

Subtitled "The Magazine of Video Lunacy!", it's a smaller-sized magazine with larger photos - rock stars, actors, scantily-clad models, and the occasional video game screenshot - which tells you right there not to expect any sort of serious journalism here.  Only 5 issues were published, over the course of a year.  Guess nobody at Creem took it seriously either.


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